LUXURY CONGLOMERATES LOOK TO HERITAGE REVIVAL

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Maison Moynat, founded in 1849, revived by LVMH in 2011

James Lawson, director of Ledbury Research, explains why well capitalised entrepreneurs are looking for opportunities with dormant prestige brands

The current economic slowdown, combined with densely crowded prestige markets, has led many entrepreneurs to consider reanimating an old brand rather than creating a new one. This entails acquiring the brand, either to restart its original activities or to use its reputation to start new production.

A brand is normally considered dormant – and, therefore, available for acquisition – if its trademarks have not been used for a number of consecutive years, usually three or five, depending on the country.

By reviving an old brand, entrepreneurs will benefit from its existing brand recognition and equity, usually defined as a combination of positive visual, verbal and emotional associations. That is to say, an historic brand intrinsically carries a sense of heritage, credibility and longevity.


“By reviving an old brand, entrepreneurs will benefit from its existing brand recognition and equity.”


Also, from a financial perspective, unlike the creation of a new brand, the reanimation of an historic brand would require a smaller initial investment to cover marketing costs.

However, reviving an old brand can also present a number of disadvantages. Beyond questioning why the brand died originally, the new products, for example, might not appeal to a younger generation or take into consideration the changes in consumers’ taste.

In addition, using an old brand to commercialise a new range of products could generate confusion in those customers who still associate it with the old products.


“Using an old brand to commercialise a new range of products could generate consumer confusion.”


Recently, the trend of re-launching historic brands has become particularly significant across the luxury industry, especially among major luxury groups that are looking for historic fashion houses with deep roots and a high level of authenticity.

A classic example is Faberge whose brand was long used for fragrances and cosmetics and only recently saw the original production of jewelled eggs restored. Similarly, LVMH acquired Moynat, a luxury leather luggage house that was founded 150 years ago but whose brand had been dormant for the past three decades.

Moreover, following its successful re-launch of the French shoemaker Roger Vivier a few years ago, this year Tod’s resuscitated Maison Schiapparelli, a fashion brand that had been dormant since 1954.


“Reviving historic brands requires a significant initial investment that only major luxury groups could likely contemplate.”


Undoubtedly, reviving historic brands requires a significant initial investment that only major luxury groups could likely contemplate, and in most cases, the name and the logo represent the only elements of continuity between the historic brand and its present incarnation.

Nevertheless, it appears to be a cost-efficient development strategy for companies looking to create an exclusive niche brand characterised by a strong sense of history and heritage.


To further investigate luxury brands on Luxury Society, we invite your to explore the related materials as follows:

2012’s Best Global Luxury Brands
What Makes for a Successful Luxury Re-Brand?
Has Luxury Brand Diversification Gone Too Far?


© Luxury Society, Luxury Conglomerates Look to Heritage Revival, 04 December 2012, by James Lawson.


Ledbury Research
is a research company specialising in the understanding and engaging of High Net Worth Individuals.

Bespoke consumer work spans all forms of quantitative and qualitative research, typically conducted on a multi-country basis, in wealth hubs around the world.

The analyst team delivers market information, trends and analysis through regular reports on the luxury and wealth markets.


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HOW THE LUXURY INDUSTRY IS LEAVING $1.7 TRILLION ON THE TABLE

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Douglas Gollan, co-founder of Elite Traveler magazine, explains why the luxury industry’s continued robust performance is coming, despite largely missed opportunities.

My mother used to always tell me I succeeded “in spite of myself.” It was her way of telling me while my intentions and instincts and many of my actions may have been right, I was making whatever the task was more difficult than it had to be.

One could argue that the luxury industry’s continued robust performance is coming despite missing some large opportunities.

A recent report by wealth researcher Wealth-X found some 185,000 households worldwide with a Net Worth of at least $30 million. These families – commonly referred to as UHNW – or Ultra High Net Worth – cumulatively are worth between $25 Trillion and $40 Trillion depending on which report one reads.

They are without doubt the “heavy users” of luxury goods and services simply because they can afford to be. After all, who else is spending $5,000 a night on suites at luxury hotels and buying $50,000 watches or $80,000 necklaces. A 2011 Washington Post research project found that U.S. households in six major markets couldn’t make ends meet despite having a Household Income of $250,000, a level considered fairly robust by media buyers.


“ Ultra High Net Worth’s are without doubt the “heavy users” of luxury goods and services simply because they can afford to be.”


The kicker was that these families didn’t even have luxury cars, didn’t buy designer fashion and had an annual vacation budget of just $3,000. In New York this Mass Affluent family was running a deficit of nearly $30,000. In other words, there was very little upside marketing to these consumers. Hundreds of brands were competing for one or two luxury purchases per year, generally for no more than a couple thousand dollars.

Greg Furman, the Founder and CEO of The Luxury Marketing Council recently told me, “luxury companies need to be more focused on selling more watches to the person who already buys a half dozen watches a year than the first watch to a person who can’t pay his rent.” He added, that as luxury companies extend their product ranges they need to invest more in educating UHNW consumers, including advertising. He uses the term “share of wallet.”

As part of a white paper I am currently working on, we are trying to understand how much these UHNW households currently spend cumulatively across a variety of luxury product and service categories – and how deep their pocket books truly are. In other words, how much more could they spend if properly educated and motivated.


“ Hundreds of brands were competing for one or two luxury purchases per year, generally for no more than a couple thousand dollars ”


The categories we are looking at include automotive, jewelry, watches, fashion and accessories, hotels, resorts, spas, villas, adventure travel, yacht rentals (not purchases), renovating and refurnishing residences and collectibles.

Obviously there is a lot of guesswork with the formulas but using research we did with Prince & Associates that included personal interviews with over 600 private jet and fractional jet owners, the current figure comes out at around $300 billion annually. That would equate to about $1.6 million in spending for each of these 185,000 UHNW households. It would also register at only around one percent or less of Net Worth.

Interestingly, as we look at numerous other surveys of luxury lifestyle spending from Ipsos, American Affluence Research Center and Unity Marketing with Mass Affluent consumers to create a range of scenarios, we believe that the potential spending of these UHNW families could be over $2 trillion!

For the Global CEO of any major luxury brand or conglomerate, I feel pretty sure they all have well developed strategies for China and E-marketing. These are considered key areas all luxury companies need to be focused on. However, I am not sure if I would find any of these same, successful companies having a Global UHNW Marketing Officer responsible for a Global UHNW strategy with a single focus to get more spend from these UHNWs and centralized authority.


“ Luxury brands have well developed strategies for China & e-Marketing, but how many have a global UHNW strategy?”


Yes, I know there are the polo sponsorships and at the country level lots of wining and dining and event invites for key customers. What I think has slipped through the cracks is these best prospects are now not in town or even in the country most of the time. I always like to say “private jets set the rich people free.” And in fact, one Richemont executive I met with referred to this group as “Homeless with 20 Homes.” Burberry has dubbed them the TLCs, short for Traveling Luxury Consumers. Global Nomads is another moniker.

Mykolas D. Rambus, CEO of Wealth-X, was right to the point: “The growing trend of the ultra wealthy choosing to establish residences in the most cosmopolitan cities around the world has implications for all professionals operating in the financial services and luxury sectors. Professionals need to understand these ultra wealthy clients, who defy being categorized by geographical location, should they wish to create consistent strategies of approach.”

Luxury houses today are still structured on a country basis with lots of country management and lots of local focus. It is not uncommon to be questioned, ‘what if your readers buy when they are in another country?’ I do understand everyone has their own revenue targets to hit. Being a global magazine, it means that some readers who are ‘based’ in the U.S. may in fact buy when they go to London or Hong Kong but at the same time readers from South America, the Middle East or Europe probably do a good deal of their buying in the U.S.


“ It’s easier to sell lots of stuff to rich people than poor people – Milton Pedraza, CEO, The Luxury Institute.”


It underscores the point that the luxury companies are enjoying success ‘despite themselves.’ Clearly, as Rambus notes, these UHNW families live a global lifestyle. A recent Financial Times piece profiled a couple who hop from London to Venice for lunch if it looks like a rainy day, and reported that today’s Super Rich follow the good weather, good schools, good tax regimes and good entertainment as they fly around on their private jets.

Milton Pedraza, the CEO of Luxury Institute once told me, “It’s easier to sell lots of stuff to rich people than poor people.” Even if the numbers I am looking at are wrong by double, luxury brands are leaving about $850 billion in sales in the pockets of UHNW customers who just need to be motivated to spend. Either way, it’s a bigger opportunity than China, bigger than the Internet, and right out there every day around the world at the nearest FBO. That’s the acronym for private jet terminal.


To further investigate Wealth & Affluence on Luxury Society, we invite your to explore the related materials as follows:

The Dangers of Homogenising the Wealthy: Ledbury Research
Key Insights from The Wealth Report 2012
Luxury’s Mixed Messages in a Yo-Yo Economy


Douglas Gollan is Group President and Co-Founder of Elite Traveler Media Group, launched in 2001, based in New York. The company publishes Elite Traveler, the private jet lifestyle magazine, with BPA audited distribution in over 100 countries worldwide by private jet.

It also publishes an Asia Edition of Elite Traveler, Elite Traveler Superyachts, Elite Traveler Hotels/Resorts/Spas Annual, Elite Traveler Annual Watch Guide and hosts over 60 Destination Guides for UHNW consumers at Elitetraveler.


© Luxury Society, How The Luxury Industry Is Leaving $1.7 Trillion On The Table, 28 June 2012, by Douglas Gollan.


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THE LATESTS BOUTIQUES: SOTHEBY’S, SHANGHAI TANG & SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

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IWC’s first U.S. flagship on Madison Avenue, New York City

The Latest openings from Armani Casa, Vacheron Constantin, Roger Vivier, IWC and Jimmy Choo, in Miami, Beijing, Costa Mesta, Milan, New York & Hong Kong

Cautious whispers of a slowdown in China have rippled through the luxury industry, despite the stellar performance of luxury goods in 2012. Ledbury Research recently confirmed the increasingly wary attitudes of luxury brand CEO’s, and pointed out that while sales have increased, in many cases market share has declined.

CLSA Asia-Pacific Markets explicitly disagrees, saying Chinese consumers will continue to purchase watches, handbags, jewellery and expensive clothes. “Wealthy individuals won’t slow down their spending,” remarked CLSA analyst Aaron Fischer to the Wall Street Journal. Barring a terrorist attack, pandemic or corruption crackdown, China will continue to lead the boom in luxury goods for years to come, according to the firm’s research.

And if brick-and-mortar store openings are anything to go buy, the luxury industry still believes in the promise of China. Vacheron Constantin this month opened its third boutique in Beijing alone, as Michael Kors launched in the city’s Shin Kong Place shopping mall and Roberto Cavalli in the Peninsula Hotel. Zegna moved into tier-2 city Shenyang, as Lancel launched a new concept store in Shanghai.

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Armani Casa, Miami

Armani Casa has moved into Miami’s new design district, with a 340sqm space at 10 NE 39th Street. It is the first Armani Casa store in Miami and the third in the United States. The store will house a range of furniture decor, tableware, decorative accessories, fabrics, ornaments, lighting and bathroom and kitchen products, as well as offering the brands “made to measure” interior design service.

Website: armanicasa.com
Source: WWD

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Dior Homme, New York

Dior Homme has launched a pop-up space in New York’s SoHo, whilst its 57th Street undergoes renovation. The Greene Street location features ready-to-wear, footwear, eyewear, leather goods, watches, jewellery and fragrance. Creative Director Kris Van Assche has selected a piece by Robert Montgomery to display in the boutique.

Website: dior.com/homme
Source: Fashion Windows

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Jimmy Choo, Hong Kong

Jimmy Choo has unveiled its first dual gender store, after expanding and renovating its boutique in Hong Kong’s Elements mall. The storefront features side-by-side entrances for women and men’s, each with its own dedicated shopping environment. The reimagined store is the first retail opening managed wholly by Jimmy Choo Hong Kong Limited, the venture created following the acquisition of the shareholding from joint venture partner Bluebell.

Website: jimmychoo.com
Source: Choo Connection

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IWC, New York

IWC Schaffhausen has opened its first US flagship in New York City at 535 Madison Avenue. The NYC store is the first of its kind, presenting the company’s watch families – Aquatimer, Pilot’s Watches, Portofino, Ingenieur, Da Vinci, and Portuguese – in themed settings that reflect their individual character.

Website & Source: iwc.com

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Lancel, Shanghai

Lancel has launched a concept store in Shanghai, designed by Christopher Pillot, who dressed the Champs-Elysees maison. The boutique features a handcrafted Murano glass chandelier and stained-glass panels, hand-painted by French artist Caroline Pregermain. Elsewhere oak flooring, brushed metals, LED lighting and vegetal furniture leathers house the brand’s accessories.

Website: lancel.com
Source: Luxury Insider

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Lamborghini, Moscow

Lamborghini has contracted with the Burevestnik Group, a luxury automobile and yacht retailer located in Moscow, to become Lamborghini’s first official dealership. A temporary sales operation has been launched in the Crocus City Mall whilst the group finalises construction of a Moscow showroom. The completed dealership will house sales, service and accessory sales for the complete Lamborghini product line-up. (Newport Beach dealership pictured)

Website: lamborghini.com
Source: Motor Authority

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Max Mara, Bucharest

Max Mara has launched a flagship store in Bucharest, which houses the Max Mara line alongside SportMax. The brand formerly operated a small store on Calea Victoriei in partnership with Alsa Group, but this new launch makes its presence in Romania one of its largest in Eastern Europe. (Paris boutique pictured)

Website: maxmara.com
Source: CPP Luxury

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Michael Kors, Beijing

Michael Kors has opened his first store in Beijing and its largest in China, located in the Shin Kong Place shopping mall. The 225sqm store retails accessories and ready-to-wear from both the main and diffusion lines and features a large format video screen showing the designer’s runway shows.

Website: michaelkors.com
Source: WWD

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Odin, New York

Niche perfume brand Odin New York has opened its first pop-up shop in collaboration with Snarkitecture. The pop up shop will remain open for six weeks, and will include all six of Odin’s unisex and home fragrances. The aim of the boutique is to showcase the product design by inverting the darkness of the packaging resulting in a bright, clean space.

Website: odinedt.com
Source: Bois de Jasmine

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Prada, Porto Cervo

Opening its second store in the Italian holiday destination of Porto Cervo, Prada has inaugurated a 95sqm space dedicated to menswear and accessories on La Passeggiata, the town’s luxury shopping street.

Website: prada.com
Source: CPP Luxury

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Roberto Cavalli, Beijing

Italian fashion designer Roberto Cavalli has opened the first phase of his debut store in China, within the arcade of the Peninsula Hotel, Beijing. The 300sqm space houses women and men’s ready-to-wear, as well as accessories, eyewear, perfumes, timewear and kidswear collections.

Website: robertocavalli.com
Source: Fashion United

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Roger Vivier, Costa Mesa

Roger Vivier has opened its third U.S. boutique, and its first in California, within the South Coast Plaza luxury mall in Costa Mesa. The 92sqm space features the brand’s seasonal footwear and accessories collections, as well as the limited-edition Rendez-Vous line for traveling.

Website: rogervivier.com
Source: WWD

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Salvatore Ferragamo, New York City

Salvatore Ferragamo’s largest boutique – its Fifth Avenue flagship – has reopened following 13th weeks of renovation. The 1,900sqm space features womenswear, menswear, accessories, shoes, and also the recently launched fine jewellery collection. The brand also used the occasion to debut the Travel Luggage Collection, set to launch this summer.

Website: ferragamo.com
Source: Style Rumor

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Shanghai Tang, Hong Kong

Shanghai Tang has launched a three-storey Mansion in Hong Kong, celebrating modern elegance and fashion through colours, exquisite fabrics, unique designs and prints. Womenswear occupies space on the ground and first floors, featuring a curved ceiling, a peony brass-inlay on the wooden flooring, fan-patterned screens and semi-circular seating.

Evoking a discreet gentleman’s club in warm hues, the calm, masculine Men’s wear floor offers ample leather seating, as well as an embossed dragon, a Chinese symbol of power.

Website & Source: shanghaitang.com

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Sotheby’s, Hong Kong

Sotheby’s is soon to open a 1,400sqm permanent exhibition space in Hong Kong, and will celebrate with a string of exhibitions running through the end of May. The gallery will occupy the entire fifth floor of One Pacific Place, the massive space will become a sort of HQ for the global auction house to expand its presence in Asia beyond its current biannual auction series in April and October.

Website: sothebys.com
Source: Jing Daily

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Vacheron Constantin, Beijing

Vacheron Constatin has unveiled its third flagship Beijing, on the ground floor of Beijing Macau Center, bringing the total number of stores worldwide to 30. The opening also coincided with the arrival of three special edition watches in Beijing and at the store, including the newly launched Patrimony Traditionnelle 14-Day Tourbillon, Métiers d’Art Kalla Haute Couture à Pampilles and the Patrimony Traditionnelle Calibre 2253.

Website: vacheron-constantin.com
Source: Luxury Insider

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Zegna, Shenyang

Ermenegildo Zegna recently celebrated the opening of its fourth China flagship, in the north-eastern luxury hotspot Shenyang. The 505sqm space within Shenyang’s MixC mall has been designed by architect Peter Marino, divided into three sections for each of Zegna’s brands: Ermenegildo Zegna suits and accessories, Z Zegna, and Z Sport.

Website: zegna.com
Source: Jing Daily

For more in the series of The Latest Boutiques, please see our most recent editions as follows:

The Latest Boutiques: Chanel, Tom Ford & Valentino
The Latest Boutiques: Céline, Chaumet & Elie Saab
The Latest Boutiques, Burberry, Bally & Boucheron


© Luxury Society, The Latest Boutiques: Sotheby’s, Shanghai Tang & Salvatore Ferragamo, 09 May 2012, by Sophie Doran.


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MEN: THE NEW LUXURY BIG SPENDERS?

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James Lawson, director of Ledbury Research, highlights the promise of luxury for men, but feels that Chinese trends may mask a global shift

Accounting for 40% of global sales, men’s spending on luxury also grew almost twice as fast as women’s in 2011, 14% compared with 8% respectively (Bain). This segment therefore remains heavily in focus by those in the luxury sector, with the likes of Burberry and Coach flagging it as an area of expansion and aiming to join the ranks of menswear veterans Giorgio Armani, Hugo Boss and Dunhill.

At Burberry, where menswear and men’s accessories currently represent 27% of sales, the brand is looking to “double sales over time”. Coach has developed a dedicated men’s space at its flagship on Madison Avenue, subsequently leading to a doubling of its men’s sales to 20%.

Luxury giants have also jumped onto the bandwagon: LVMH’s Berluti expanded its niche from luxury footwear to debut its first men’s ready-to-wear collection at Paris Fashion Week in January, while PPR bought Italian suitmaker Brioni in November last year and signalled its faith in the segment’s prospects by announcing an expanded offering as well as new flagship plans for Europe, America, China and the Middle East.


“ Accounting for 40% of global sales, men’s spending on luxury also grew almost twice as fast as women’s in 2011 ”


Alexander McQueen is another brand investing in menswear. The PPR owned house will open a 185sqm dedicated space on London’s Savile Row in September, showcasing both the ready-to-wear collection and Alexander McQueen by Huntsman, a bespoke service announced in January. Prices for the bespoke service will range from £4,500 – £5,000 and the pieces will take about 12 weeks to make.

Creative director, Sarah Burton, said bespoke was a natural progression for the brands menswear offering. “We already offer couture for women, and wanted to add it for men. And our clients were asking for it. With this service we want to give them beautiful, handcrafted clothes, and emphasize artisanal work,” she told WWD.

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Net-a-Porter’s menswear counterpart, Mr Porter, launched in February 2011.

 

Many attribute this growth to China, where men account for over two-thirds (70%) of all luxury sales. This is in part due to the popular gift-giving culture amongst businessmen and government officials. The question, however, is whether this has been overhyped, and if Chinese male appetites for luxury are sustainable in the long term.

Because while China may currently still be dominated by male spending, this appears to be changing: we are seeing Chinese women play an increasing role in wealth creation (see High Net Worth December 2011). The rise of self-purchasing women may soon come to overshadow male demand in China, and cause a shift in the balance of luxury demand between the genders (see Ledbury’s Modern Matriarch Chinese Wealth Segment).


“ Many attribute this growth to China, where men account for over two-thirds (70%) of all luxury sales ”


Despite this, brands are still targeting men, the new big luxury spenders. This is partly due to the globally shifting attitudes. Traditionally male spend has been impacted faster and harder by the downturn, but men are now becoming more discerning.

Net -a-Porter’s Mr. Porter (since February 2011), Gilt Groupe’s GiltMAN (October 2009) and the latter’s full-price men’s site Park & Bond (August 2011) have not only tapped into the relatively underpenetrated online space in menswear, they have also recognized the change in the shopping habits of today’s men and have invested heavily in their editorial content.

Park & Bond, a partnership with GQ magazine, offers advice and how-tos, buying guides, and even free personal shopper assistance on their website to “find your own personal style”. As a further sign of male demand, Gilt has invested in a full-price men’s site before that for women, indicating the large potential in online male luxury spend.


The above is based on a collection of insights taken from Ledbury Research’s flagship publication High Net Worth. For more information please visit this link.


Ledbury Research
is a research company specialising in the understanding and engaging of High Net Worth Individuals.

Bespoke consumer work spans all forms of quantitative and qualitative research, typically conducted on a multi-country basis, in wealth hubs around the world.

The analyst team delivers market information, trends and analysis through regular reports on the luxury and wealth markets.


© Luxury Society, Men: The New Luxury Big Spenders?, 10 April 2012, by James Lawson.


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THE MIXED PERFORMANCE OF LUXURY IN 2011

Aside

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James Lawson, director of Ledbury Research, shares the key market insights that characterised the luxury industry in 2011.

The Story So Far

Following strong performance in 2010, luxury momentum was sustained throughout the first half of 2011. Growth forecasts remain in double digits going into 2012 – Ledbury forecasts growth at 16% for 2011 and a 11% for next year. That said, greater caution is advised in the short-term, as certain segments still have some way to go, before demand fully recovers from the effects of the economic crisis.

Using the year-on-year quarterly figures of the key segments of the luxury industry, we can see that luxury has been in positive terrain since the start of 2010. Particularly strong results in 2010 made for more challenging comparables, however, performance has held up relatively well, with double-digit growth for the first two quarters of 2011.

Asia has been central to this growth, however other regions – such as South America – have also emerged this year as promising markets for luxury. Europe and the US, while still not fully recovered, are expanding again and the Middle East also showed positive movement over the period. Notably, Japan withstood the effects of the March earthquake better than expected and posted growth, following several consecutive years of contraction.


“ Going forward, luxury executives are upbeat about performance and it is anticipated that China will continue to drive this ”


Looking to the Future

Going forward, luxury executives are upbeat about performance and it is anticipated that China will continue to drive this. Separately , research undertaken by Bain & Co and Altagamma, suggests that the global luxury market will expand to €191 bn in 2011 – up from €173 bn in 2010 – and mark the second consecutive year of double-digit growth for the luxury industry.

Regionally, Europe currently accounts for the largest share overall (37%), however this will shrink due to rapid growth in Asia-Pacific, which currently holds 17% of the market. China (€9.6 bn) is now bigger than that in the UK (€9.0 bn) and is being driven by demand for luxury cars, hotels and, personal luxury. China will grow to €12.9 bn by the end of the year. Brazil meanwhile, is a small (€1.9 bn) market, and is forecast to increase to €2.3 bn by the end of the year. Luxury demand there will be characterised by demand for fine wines.

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A Star Performer: Swiss Timepieces

Demand for Swiss watches recorded strong growth (22%) in 2010, following significant declines in 2009 (-22%). The resurgence in watch consumption was driven by Asia, where luxury watches are frequently bought as gifts. In total, the region accounted for more than half (53%) of global demand, and registered a 35% uptick on demand in 2009 (FHS). In addition, the average Asian consumer purchased more expensive watches than their counterparts in Europe and the US (FHS).

Growth in Europe (10%) and America (15%) was positive, however, sales in Europe have not yet returned to pre-crisis levels. Further, 2009 saw a 36% contraction in American sales, thereby making for a relatively easier base for comparison in 2010. That said, luxury watches are expected to sustain this momentum in the near future and indeed pegged to be one of the star performers of 2011. Many luxury brands are expanding into this segment as a result.


“ The average Asian consumer purchased more expensive watches than their counterparts in Europe and the US ”


Challenges Ahead: Yachts

Sadly, the same levels of performance optimism cannot be seen in the case of Yachts, with sales expected to fall again this year – albeit to a much lesser extent than in 2010.

The declines of the past 2 years are largely attributable to a fall-off in demand from the US, which has historically been the biggest market in regional terms, and also Europe where there has long been a tradition of yachting. Demand is not expected to pick up in either market again until there is more economic certainty.

Another compounding factor in the yachting industry is that, unlike many other luxury segments, where Chinese demand has cushioned the fall in demand from the West, yachting in China is still in its infancy. Currently, there is no culture of yachting in China, and it is mainly the Hong Kong Chinese who enjoy the past time. This is expected to change, and the past two years has seen several Chinese yachting brands launch to cater to domestic demand.


The above is a collection of insights taken from Ledbury Research’s flagship publication High Net Worth. For more information please visit this link.

© Luxury Society, The Mixed Performance of Luxury in 2011 by James Lawson.


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